Anesthesiology

 

Anesthesiologists are physicians who are responsible for the planning, coordination, and administration of anesthesia during surgical procedures and critical care. They also work closely with our nursing team to perform pre-operative assessments required to ensure smooth surgery. Prime’s anesthesiology team is committed to keep our patients safe and comfortable throughout the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods.

Anaesthesia is a reversible state of loss of pain and immobility with or without sleep that allows surgical procedures to be performed on a patient, safely and without any discomfort. Once surgery is planned a patient will meet an anaesthesiologist for an interview. At the interview the anaesthesiologist assesses a patient’s medical history, current medications, allergies and past experiences with anaesthesia. This information helps the anaesthesiologist to choose the kind of anaesthesia that will work best and be the safest for each patient. The interview is also an opportunity for the patient to ask questions about any concerns related to the procedure.

Types of anesthesia used are:

Regional anesthesia:

The anesthesiologist makes an injection near a cluster of nerves to numb the area of your body that requires surgery. You might be awake, or you may be given something to help you relax, sometimes called a sedative.

There are several kinds of regional anesthesia. Two of the most frequently used are spinal and epidural anesthesia, which are produced by injections made with great exactness in the appropriate areas of the back.

Epidural Anesthesia:

An epidural, commonly used for labor and delivery, is primarily for lower pelvic surgery and can be used with general anesthesia. Occasionally, epidurals are used for post-operative pain management.

Spinal Anesthesia:

Spinal anesthesia is used to anaesthetize the lower body.

General anaesthesia:

General anaesthesia renders a patient unconscious during the surgical procedure. General anaesthesia is commonly produced by a combination of intravenous drugs and inhaled gases (anaesthetics). The "sleep" one experiences under general anaesthesia is different from regular sleep. The anesthetized brain doesn't respond to pain signals or surgical manipulations. The anaesthesiologist is responsible for controlling the patients breathing and monitoring the body's vital functions during the procedure. He monitors the patient continuously during the procedure, adjusting medications, breathing, temperature, fluids and blood pressure as needed. Any abnormalities that occur during the surgery are corrected by administering additional medications, fluids and, sometimes, blood transfusions.

Local Anesthesia:

Local anesthesia affects only the area involved in the procedure and may be used in combination with sedation.

Monitored Sedation:

Monitored sedation keeps the patient relaxed and comfortable. Depending on the procedure, the patient may remain awake and aware throughout the procedure or may be drowsy or in a light sleep.

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